An Update That Never Posted.

Hey! So, it looks like I had this draft saved from the beginning of March that I literally never hit “publish” on, that covered quite a lot, so I’m going to attempt to condense it here:

1) I participated in my first-ever conference AND unconference, History Camp. It was put together by Lee Wright of the History List and it was a great time. It brought professional and amateur historians, museologists, educators, archaeologists, and other people who were interested in history, together for a day full of fascinating talks and panels. It was run in much the same way THATCamp is run (BarCamp style); for the sake of gathering a lot of interest beforehand, many of the sessions were scheduled ahead of time, and included talks by Mass Historical Society, Liz Covart, J.L. Bell, Eric Bauer, and Lee Wright. I gave a talk on objects as sources of history with my fellow emerging museum professional (who might now be heading into the education field) Adriene Katz; I discussed the method of provenance research and how any object can be a source of history as long as you dig, and then used Carl Akeley’s Fighting African Elephants from the Field Museum as an example for how this research is done on a biological museum specimen. Adriene gave a great talk about a tour she developed while working at the Shelburne Museum that focused on the Prentice and Stencil Houses as sources of history. If you want to see our presentations, click HERE and HERE!

2) I don’t think it’s 100% official yet, but I’m pretty sure I’m going to be volunteering with the HMNH education department this July for Summer Science Camps! I’m so excited!! I already chose the sessions I’m going to help in (of course, they include dinosaurs and geology), and it seems like everyone in the department is really excited to have me on board and have me be as eager as I am to get some ed-experience. I’m hoping I’ll be able to take some of what I’m learning from my “Understanding the Visitor Experience” class this semester and use it this summer. Speaking of, that class is proving to be harder than I initially expected it to be. Trying to wrap my head around goals and objectives – I don’t know how you guys do it. Though, I did just read quite a few articles on meaning-making and constructivism, and I have a whole other blog post I’m planning based on my most recent museum experience for that (stay tuned!).

3) As many of you are probably aware by now, I’ve taken over the social media for the Waterworks Museum. This is so incredibly hard, guys. I had no idea just how difficult managing a social media account other than my own would be, but man, it’s difficult. Constantly thinking of new and interesting subject matter to post can be super easy sometimes, and stupidly hard other days. Plus, I have no idea how effective I’m really being, since I’m not sure how to read all of the analytics from HootSuite. Luckily, the museum has offered to pay for me to take a social media management class this summer, so eventually I’ll learn how to deal with all of the numbers, and hopefully be able to run the pages better! If you guys don’t mind, check out the Waterworks Twitter feed @MetroWaterworks and tell me how I’m doing, ok? It would mean a lot to me. Also, if any of you manage social media networks and have tips, either email me or post them in the comments, because I am more than happy to get help where I can. (Big shout out to Erin Blasco of the Smithsonian for already answering so many of my questions!)

4) I’m giving my first tour at the April vacation open house at the Waterworks Museum later this month! I’m super nervous and excited at the same time, because I’m planning this tour on my own. It’s going to be an architecture tour, and not just of our building, but of two other buildings on the museum “campus” (and if visitors have questions about more buildings on the campus I’ll answer them too!). We have so many unique styles of architecture that we rarely ever talk about, and I just think it’ll be a great new addition to what we usually offer on family days. Plus, I’m hoping it will be nice out, and people will want to be outside. I’ve never planned a tour before, but I’m thinking about comparing our buildings to buildings that people might be used to seeing in downtown Boston (like Trinity Church and the Boston Public Library) so they can build on their prior knowledge (yeahhhh constructivism!). It’s going to be hard work, but I want this to be a dynamite tour.

I had planned on writing a post about making meaning in museums and my own personal meaning-making experience from earlier this week, but I wanted to post this update as well. Anyway, that’s all for now!

An Update That Never Posted.

The West End Street Railway Central Power Station

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If you live in Boston, chances are you’ve heard of the SoWa Open Market and the SoWa Vintage Market. Or just SoWa in general. Located in Boston’s fashionable and posh South End, SoWa (South of Washington St) is home to many old brick buildings, including this one, at 540 Harrison Avenue. Now used as additional parking for the SoWa Markets, this Romanesque/Gothic Revival structure stands as a reminder of Boston’s transportation history.

The building was designed by William G. Preston and built between 1889-1892, and served as the West End Street Railway’s Central Power Station. A precursor to the Massachusetts Bay Transportation Authority, the WESR created the power station to provide electricity for the growing streetcar system. When it was built, the Central Power Station was the largest in the world, with its (now gone) smokestack reaching higher than the Bunker Hill Monument. The building now stands empty, allowing shoppers to ditch their cars while they peruse the vintage and open markets; but this space was once filled with (at least) six 1000hp triple expansion steam engines, four-pole 250kW railway generators, and who knows what else, all required to keep the streetcars running efficiently. After 1899, the station went on to supply power to the Boston Elevated Railway (BERy).

The CPS was purchased and renovated by 540 Harrison Avenue Realty Trust in 1998. The roofs were restored using the original slates, buttressing was fixed, the facades were restored and cleaned, and new windows were installed to match the original glazing. Now you can visit the CPS whenever you want. Make sure you check out the incredible steel rafters running through the building! It’s a glorious monument to Boston’s architectural and transportation history.

See more of the photos I took on my Flickr page.

Sources:
Boston Preservation Alliance
IEEE Boston
Boston Herald

The West End Street Railway Central Power Station